Choose a
Different State

Go

Florida Motorcycle Handbook: Passing and Being Passed

The Florida Motorcycle Driver Handbook contains all of the information that you need to familiarize yourself with the concepts on the license exam!

Florida Motorcycle Handbook: Passing and Being Passed

Table of Contents

5. Ride within your Abilities

Passing and being passed by another vehicle is not much different than with a car. However, visibility is more critical. Be sure other drivers see you, and that you see potential hazards.

5.10.1 - Passing

  1. Ride in the left portion of the lane at a safe following distance to increase your line of sight and make you more visible. Signal and check for oncoming traffic. Use your mirrors and turn your head to look for traffic behind.
  2. When safe, move into the left lane and accelerate. Select a lane position that doesn't crowd the car you are passing and provides space to avoid hazards in your lane.
  3. Ride through the blind spot as quickly as possible.
  4. Signal again, and complete mirror and headchecks before returning to your original lane and then cancel the signal.

Remember, passes must be completed within posted speed limits, and only where permitted. Know your signs and road markings!

5.10.2 - Being Passed

When you are being passed from behind or by an oncoming vehicle, stay in the center portion of your lane. Riding any closer to them could put you in a hazardous situation.

Avoid being hit by:

  • The other vehicle - A slight mistake by you or the passing driver could cause a sideswipe.
  • Extended mirrors - Some drivers forget that their mirrors hang out farther than their fenders.
  • Objects thrown from windows - Even if the driver knows you're there, a passenger may not see you and might toss something on you or the road ahead of you.
  • Blasts of wind from larger vehicles - They can affect your control. You have more room for error if you are in the middle portion when hit by this blast than if you were on either side of the lane. Do not move into the portion of the lane farthest from the passing vehicle. It might invite the other driver to cut back into your lane too early.